23 results
 Applied Geoscience and Technology Division (SOPAC) of SPC

Nauru is a single raised coral island
with a total land area of 21 sq km.
Despite its small land area, Nauru has
an EEZ that extends over more than
320 000 sq km. Its maximum height
above sea level is approximately 70 m.

Kept in vertical file collection|Also available electronically

Call Number: VF 4339 [EL]

Physical Description: 11 p. ; 29 cm

 Applied Geoscience and Technology Division (SOPAC) of SPC

The Cook Islands comprises 15 islands with a total
land area of 237 sq km and a
maximum height above sea-level of
652 m. The islands are scattered over
an Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of
1.8 million sq km; one of the largest
EEZ’s in the South Pacific.

Kept in vertical file collection|also available electronically

Call Number: VF 4343 [EL]

Physical Description: 13 p. ; 29 cm

 Applied Geoscience and Technology Division (SOPAC) of SPC

Practioners representing national, regional and international agencies, tertiary institutions and non-government organizations involved in coastal management met at the offices of the South Pacific Applied Geosciences Commission (SOPAC) 10-12 December 2003. The meeting was convened by the Secretariat for the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP) to discuss current initiatives and emerging issues relating to coastal management in the Pacific Islands region.

E-file kept in "FL" field

Call Number: VF 6591 (EL)

 Applied Geoscience and Technology Division (SOPAC) of SPC

"SOPAC is mandated by 18 Pacific Island Countries (PICs) to provide technical policy and project level advice on the sustainable development, utilization and protection of water resources in its member countries. Of particular concern is the capacity of urban and rural water supply systems to provide safe drinking water, and the impact of inadequate sanitation facilities on water resources, the environment and public health.

 Applied Geoscience and Technology Division (SOPAC) of SPC

The Cook Islands, a self-governing country in the central South Pacific consists of fifteen islands, all islands between 8°S and 23°S and 156°W and 167°W. It is geographically divided into two groups a Northern Group comprising Penrhyn, Rakahanga, Manihiki,Suwarrow, Nassau and Pukapuka. All are atolls except Nassau. The Southern Group comprises Palmerston, Rarotonga,Mangaia, Mauke and Atiu as high islands; Aitutaki a part atoll with a volcanic peak and a large lagoon: Mitiaro an elevated coral island and Manuae and Palmerston atolls. Tukutea is a small island near Atiu.

 Applied Geoscience and Technology Division (SOPAC) of SPC

In summary, the coast is part of an emergent, Holocene reef-carbonate system, with the beach being comprised entirely of carbonate sediments developed on phosphate-rich, cavernous, dolomite limestone bedrock. The coastline is partly rocky with classic karst limestone pinnacles found throughout the bay. The reef is a coral dominated system and is narrow and well-flushed, with many closely-spaced reef channels. The coastline at Anibare Bay is an active and dynamic one. The relatively coarse admixture of abraded sand and gravel and highly abraded karts pinnacles testify to this.

 Applied Geoscience and Technology Division (SOPAC) of SPC

As populations grow in Pacific Island Countries, urbanisation and development expand and pressure on the coastal zone increases. Demands are made for land reclamation and coastal stabilisation. The coast is expected to provide more and more resources ranging from construction materials to food, to ab-
sorb growing amounts of domestic and industrial refuse, as well as to continue to retain its cultural importance.

Available online|One copy

Call Number: 333.917099 SHE [EL]

Physical Description: 40 p. : col. photos ; 20 cm

 Applied Geoscience and Technology Division (SOPAC) of SPC

The Training of Trainers (TOT) Workshop on Rainwater Harvesting took place in Vava'u, Tonga from 12-15 May 2004. Involving community extension workers from the Village Women's Development Programme (VWDP) of the Tonga Community Development Trust (TCDT), the training was based on a participatory approach that emphasised 'learning-by-doing'. Using a step-by-step process, workshop participants were introduced to various participatory tools and took part in participatory activities and exercises that they could potentially use during future training on rainwater harvesting in communities.

 Applied Geoscience and Technology Division (SOPAC) of SPC

Nauru is a small country comprising a single island with an area of only 22 km2. The island is having severe difficulties in achieving a safe and adequate supply of potable water and suffers from pollution of local groundwater due to inadequate sanitation services. The problems have arisen from the collapse of the utility services when phosphate mining ceased, followed by a national financial crisis.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 6 Pages

 Applied Geoscience and Technology Division (SOPAC) of SPC

This report serves as to create an overview of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) progress and activities in the Pacific Island Countries (PICs). The overview is to form part of a submission by the GWP (Global Water Partnership) Secretariat at the forthcoming;
"(i) donor meeting to mobilise and seek support for IWRM in February, 2004, and the
(ii) CSD conference in New York, March, 2004".

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 37 p.

 Applied Geoscience and Technology Division (SOPAC) of SPC

This report identifies the present status of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) in the Fiji Islands and barriers to the more effective implementation of IWRM. Because water performs so many important functions for society, the responsibility for water is always spread among different organisations, public and private, and is located among several government ministries. IWRM is both a set of mechanisms and a process.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 35 p.

 Applied Geoscience and Technology Division (SOPAC) of SPC

Small island nations in the Pacific face water supply and sanitation problems amongst the most critical in the world. This is especially so in the Republic of Kiribati where shallow, fresh groundwater is the major source of water. It is extremely vulnerable to natural and human- induced changes. Storm surges, droughts and over-extraction cause seawater intrusion. Settlements and agricultural activities can extremely rapidly pollute the shallow groundwater. The incidence of illnesses and deaths from water-borne diseases, especially amongst children, are unacceptably large.

 Applied Geoscience and Technology Division (SOPAC) of SPC

Water resources are finite and fragile, and yet they are under increasing pressure from population growth, urbanisation, economic development and other forces. This is especially true even in the small islands of the Pacific. Different uses of water are interlinked and interdependent. It is important therefore to take a holistic approach to the management of water resources. These are the underlying principles of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM).

Available online|Draft version 3.0

Call Number: [EL]

 Applied Geoscience and Technology Division (SOPAC) of SPC

Small Pacific Island countries (PIC) rely heavily on the freshwater resources. However, due to the small land masses of many PICs, most of the freshwater sources are under pressure from overuse and/or pollution leading to deteriorating water quality due to urbanisation, economic development, and population growth. The pollution of freshwater resources also lend a hand to the pollution of marine ecosystems, which many Pacific Islanders rely on heavily for sustenance. Urbanisation and population increases weigh heavily on wastewater disposal,

 Applied Geoscience and Technology Division (SOPAC) of SPC

Water is essential for human, faunal and floral physiology. Water sustains life and is essential for climatic equilibrium, the maintenance of ecosystems, agriculture, industrial processing and hydropower. In many countries, increasing population, natural resource extraction, food production,

 Applied Geoscience and Technology Division (SOPAC) of SPC

The economic and social wellbeing of Pacific Island Countries are dependent upon the quality and quantity of their freshwater. Constrained by their relative small size, natural vulnerability,
and limited human and financial resource base, Pacific Small Island Developing States face specific challenges to effectively manage their water resources.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 105 p.

 Applied Geoscience and Technology Division (SOPAC) of SPC

The Solomon Islands is characterised by scattered islands that vary considerably in size, physical and hydrologic characteristics. The types of islands range from high volcanic to tiny low coral atolls. The higher islands have river systems whilst the low coral atolls have no natural surface water systems and are completely dependent upon rainwater catchments and groundwater.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 86 p.

 Applied Geoscience and Technology Division (SOPAC) of SPC

The structure of this diagnostic report follows the outline of the Pacific Regional Action Plan on sustainable Water Management (Pacific RAP) arranged over six thematic areas of water
resources management, island vulnerability, awareness, technology, institutional arrangements and financing, preceded by a general chapter on relevant background information on Tonga.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 73 p.

 Applied Geoscience and Technology Division (SOPAC) of SPC

Tuvalu is a Pacific Island country of 9 low-lying coral atolls, humid tropical climate and high rainfall, with limited land area, high mean population densities, and an Environmental Vulnerability Index of 3.6. Tuvalu has a GDP per capita of US$1,681. 30% of GDP is attributable to government wages, with 40% from public enterprises. The private sector contributes approximately 30% of GDP of which half is from external remittances.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 57 p.