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 SPREP Pacific Environment Information Network (PEIN)

Matter and energy budgets for coral reefs, their components, and the world around them can, do, and must balance in a theorical context (Smith and Kinsey, 1988). In this paper, we will try to
establish nitrogen, phosphorus and silica budgets between ocean and lagoon waters of Tikehau atoll in the purpose to learn more about the functioning of coral reef lagoons. Nutrient concentrations (dissolved components and particulate organic matter) were measured in the lagoon and in the surrounding oceanic surface waters between 1983 and 1987.

Available online

 SPREP Pacific Environment Information Network (PEIN)

Guam is the southernmost island in the Mariana Islands
Archipelago. Of all the islands in Micronesia, Guam is the
largest in terms of both land area (543 sq km) and population

 SPREP Pacific Environment Information Network (PEIN)

Pacific Islanders traditionally have enjoyed diverse ways to achieve food security, through gardening, fishing, hunting, and selling products or labour for cash, reports JON BARNETT.
But robust local food production has significantly been eroded with urbanisation and cheap, poor quality food imports. Climate change will increase threats to food security, through

 SPREP Pacific Environment Information Network (PEIN)

Tonga has made "good and steady progress" towards the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), as reported in Tonga 1st National Status Report: Millennium Development Goals Today and Tomorrow and summarised .

 SPREP Pacific Environment Information Network (PEIN)

The report on a new regional institutional framework was commissioned by the Pacific Plan Action Committee (PPAC). The aim in doing so was to present the report to Pacific Islands Forum Leaders at their October 2006 meeting, after PPAC had considered it in August 2006 in Nadi,Fiji Islands.

 SPREP Pacific Environment Information Network (PEIN)

Principles for designing marine protected area (MPA) networks that address social, economic, and biological criteria are well established in the scientific literature. Climate change represents a new and serious threat to marine ecosystems, but, to date, few studies have specifically considered how to design MPA networks to be resilient to this emerging threat. Here, we compile the best available information on MPA network design and

 SPREP Pacific Environment Information Network (PEIN)

In February 2005 Campaign Strategy Ltd1 and Cultural Dynamics2 (CDSM
Cultural Dynamics Strategy and Marketing) commissioned a nationally
representative telephone survey of over 1000 adults, who were asked a number
of questions about climate change. Some of those results3 are reported here.
The same sample was asked a large number of other questions about
environmental issues, and their political identity. They were also asked ten
questions about their lives which enable Cultural Dynamics to place them into 12

 SPREP Pacific Environment Information Network (PEIN)

Vulnerable ecosystems-• Sea?level rise
• Increasing temperatures
• Changes in rainfall
• Ocean acidification
• Coral reefs
• Increased storm activity
Overall in Melanesia the central mountains of New
Guinea and the coral reefs and ocean life in the
outer islands of Papua New Guinea most impacted.
In the wider Pacific inundation is a major threat.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 22 p.

 SPREP Pacific Environment Information Network (PEIN)

The purpose of the action is to improve transportation and reduce maintenance cost by upgrading
causeway between Foa and Lifuka Islands, to become more resilient and less vulnerable to impacts
of high energy waves. Built in the period 1978-1979, the raised coral structure has served the people
of Foa and Lifuka well despite increasing maintenance cost. The replacement structure is similar to
the existing one but with rock armoring to reduce the energy of waves impacting on the structure

 SPREP Pacific Environment Information Network (PEIN)

The freshwater resources of small island states can be classified as either "conventional" or "nonconventional." Conventional resources include rainwater collected from artificial or natural surfaces, groundwater, and surface water. Nonconventional resources include seawater or brackish groundwater desalination, water importation by barge or submarine pipeline, treated wastewater, and substitution (such as the use of coconuts during droughts) (Falkland 1999a).

Kept in vertical file collection|Source: The World's Water 2002-2003. Chapter 5: 113-131

 SPREP Pacific Environment Information Network (PEIN)

Following the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development, the governments of the Asian and Pacific region have, within certain limitations and constraints, drawn up and implemented national strategies, action plans and programmes to attain the objectives of sustainable development. The international, regional and subregional organizations have developed their respective action programmes to assist the governments in their efforts. There were also some common problems and transboundary issues that lent themselves to action at the regional and subregional levels.

 SPREP Pacific Environment Information Network (PEIN)

The biodiversity of the Pacific region is recognised as being globally significant. The Solomon Islands was recently included into the famous "Coral Triangle", the area of ocean considered to have the highest marine biodiversity in the world. This includes the waters of the Philippines, Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. The Solomon Islands Rainforest Ecoregion is recognised as "one of the world's great Centres of Plant Diversity"

 SPREP Pacific Environment Information Network (PEIN)

The main map shows that higher population densities occur (i) around and inland from major coastal towns, (ii) in the elevated PNG Highlands (H) and the Baliem Valley (B) of Papua, and (iii) along most of the coasts of the mainland and major islands. The distributions of inhabited places and of annual fires reveal that people and their effects are widely dispersed across much of the landscape. However, vast landscapes in the upper catchments of the Mamberamo River (M) in Papua and in parts of the upper Fly River (F) and Sepik River (S) in PNG remain sparsely inhabited.

 SPREP Pacific Environment Information Network (PEIN)

Fish communities in the lagoon of the Tikehau atoll were studied by only a few researchers. Harmelin-Vivien (1984) studied the distribution of the main herbivorous families (Scaridae and Acanthuridae) in the lagoon and on the outer slope to 30 m in depth. The total fish community of the outer slope was studied by Galzin (1985, 1987) at 12 m in depth. These studies were carried out in the southwestern part of the atoll. Spatial organization of coral associated fish community was studied throughout the lagoon by Morize et al. (1990). Most of the other

 SPREP Pacific Environment Information Network (PEIN)

Some presentations refer to the term Marine Managed Area (MMA) instead of Marine Protected Area (MPA) in order to cover more management options. The workshop proposed and adopted a rough typology of MM As that will be useful to communicate with the key decision makers (land use planners, coastal zone planners and managers, regional planners, protected area planners and managers, community leaders, sectorial planners in fisheries and environment...)

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 28 p.

 SPREP Pacific Environment Information Network (PEIN)

This paper attempts to present a "quick snapshot" of the current status of biodiversity in the Pacific Islands and the prospects and challenges for the mainstreaming of its conservation and sustainable use by Pacific Island peoples during the 21st century. It is hoped that it will form the basis for useful discussion dining the conference. Particular emphasis is placed on providing an understanding of the status of biodiversity, not only from a scientific perspective, but also from the view of the Pacific Island peoples who have owned and used it for millennia!

 SPREP Pacific Environment Information Network (PEIN)

IF YOU HAVEN'T HEARD of Tuvalu, the fourth-smallest country in the world, so much the better, because its nine square miles of diy land may soon disappear from sight like a polished stone chopped in the deep sea. And if that happens, it might be
unpleasant to consider that the basic amenities of our lifestyle-our cars and planes and power plants, our well-lighted, well-cooled and -heated homes-have brought about the
obliteration of an ancient, peaceful civilization halfway around the world.

E-copy available from "FL" field|Downloaded off the internet

 SPREP Pacific Environment Information Network (PEIN)

The directory aims to promote interaction and active partnerships among key development organisations in civil society, including NGOs, trade unions, faith-based organizations, indigenous peoples movements, foundations and research centres. In creating opportunities for dialogue with
governments and private sector, civil society organizations are helping to amplify the voices of the poorest people in the decisions that affect their lives, improve development effectiveness and sustainability and hold governments and policymakers publicly accountable.

 SPREP Pacific Environment Information Network (PEIN)

Climate, biodiversity, and human well-being are inextricably linked. Significant policy objectives for each
now exist in international political commitments and country actions. Although our understanding of these processes and their inter-relationships is far from complete we know enough to identify some critically important components for immediate attention and priority areas for research and policy development. New mechanisms will be needed to galvanise work in this area, especially at the inter-governmental level.