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 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

The PIER database is focused on plant species that are known to have been introduced to the Pacific region including the Pacific Rim. It provides listings and descriptions of plant species that threaten ecosystems and also listed many other invasive and potentially invasive plant species present in and around the Pacific region

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

This paper attempts to present a “quick snapshot” of the status of biodiversity in the Pacific Islands and the prospects and challenges for the mainstreaming of its conservation and sustainable use by Pacific Island peoples during the 21st century

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

A Pacific information brief from the Pacific Invasives Partnership (a working group of the Roundtable for Nature Conservation in the Pacific Islands)

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

This report is primarily directed to analyzing the legal aspects of ecosystem-based adaptation to climate change. It sketches the impacts of climate change in the Pacific Island countries, recognizing that climate change directly impacts ecosystems, which provide for the needs of people as well as for the maintenance of the natural environment.

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

The Helping Islands Adapt workshop was held in Auckland, New Zealand between the 11th and 16th of April 2010 to support regional action against invasive species on islands, in order to preserve biodiversity and adapt to climate change. It arose from decisions under the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) relating to invasive alien species and island biodiversity.

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

This study, commissioned by the UNEP/CMS Secretariat, aims to identify how climate change is likely to affect individual migratory species, and the degree of threat that they face.

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

There are three species of rat in the Pacific, the Polynesian rat Rattus exulans (the smallest), the ship rat Rattus rattus and the Norwegian rat Rattus norvegicus (the largest). Rats are one of the most damaging pests in urban zones, and this document is a guide on how and why it is necessary to control in the region.

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

This review was undertaken to examine the invasive species management components within the National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plans of twelve Pacific island countries (PICs): Cook Islands, Fiji, Federated States of Micronesia, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga and Vanuatu.

Inform: Helping to strengthen governance and decision making through addressing gaps in environmental data across the Pacific region.

Short, quick pops of information to help enhance your speeches, media interviews and soundbites, presentations and general message sharing when it comes work done by Pacific islands with support from the Inform Project on environmental data use in the Pacific.

The participants of the Inform South-South Collaboration workshop in Apia, Samoa

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

This dataset has all icons for Multilateral Environment Agreements such as SDGs and Aichi

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 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

The Strandings of Oceania database is a collaborative project between SPREP, WildMe and the South Pacific Whale Research Consortium to record stranding and beachcast data for whales, dolphins and dugongs throughout the Pacific. We use a platform called Flukebook. An account is needed to view or use data within Flukebook but the data is available for download here. You can submit data direct into Flukebook (preferably while logged in) or send a completed data form to SPREP for upload. Guidance on using the database is available :

 Solomon Islands Ministry of Environment,  Climate Change,  Disaster Management and Meteorology

Map of Coral Species Richness in Solomon Islands EEZ. Grid based dataset that shows the number of coral species that are expected to be found-

 Solomon Islands Ministry of Environment,  Climate Change,  Disaster Management and Meteorology

A map created by MACBIO as resource for the bioregions workshop in Feb 2018, showing Ecologically or Biologically Significant Marine Areas (EBSAs), Key Biodiversity Areas (KBAs) and Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBAs).

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 Solomon Islands Ministry of Environment,  Climate Change,  Disaster Management and Meteorology

Protected Areas Act

 Solomon Islands Ministry of Environment,  Climate Change,  Disaster Management and Meteorology

Maps, spreadsheets, publications and reports on protected areas in Solomon Islands, comprising both marine and terrestrial areas.

 Solomon Islands Ministry of Environment,  Climate Change,  Disaster Management and Meteorology

State party reports, documents, maps and publications of the East Rennell Lake Tengano World Heritage Area as inscribed by the World Heritage Convention in 1998.

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

Green Turtle Nesting Sites and Sea Turtle Legislation throughout Oceania

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

AquaMaps are computer-generated predictions of natural occurrence of marine species, based on the environmental tolerance of a given species with respect to depth, salinity, temperature, primary productivity, and its association with sea ice or coastal areas. These 'environmental envelopes' are matched against an authority file which contains respective information for the Oceans of the World. Independent knowledge such as distribution by FAO areas or bounding boxes are used to avoid mapping species in areas that contain suitable habitat, but are not occupied by the species.

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

This dataset shows the modelled global patterns of above-ground biomass of mangrove forests. The dataset was developed by the Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, with support from The Nature Conservancy. The work is based on a review of 95 field studies on carbon storage and fluxes in mangroves world-wide. A climate-based model for potential mangrove above-ground biomass was developed, with almost four times the explanatory power of the only previous published model.